Introducing a New Resource for Schools and Families

Are you smarter than a fifth grader? See how your preparedness IQ stacks up by answering these questions (correct answers are at the bottom of the post):

  • You and your parent are driving home from school in a heavy rain. You see that the road ahead of you is covered in water. What do you do?
  • A smoke alarm wakes you in the middle of the night. What do you do?
  • You’re enjoying an afternoon at the park with your friends, when dark clouds develop and you hear thunder. What do you do?

Fifth grade students at Eastvalley Elementary School in Marietta present what they’ve learned in class about emergency preparedness.

These three questions are from a lesson plan that is part of Ready Georgia’s new teacher and parent toolkit. Interactive activities such as

these role-playing scenarios are one method experts recommend to make children more comfortable with potentially scary topics. That is why Ready Georgia has developed the toolkit, which provides parents and teachers with activities and multimedia resources that can educate children about emergency preparedness in a fun, nonthreatening way. The toolkit can easily be used in the classroom with lesson plans that are designed to complement third, fourth and fifth grade health and science curriculum.

As mentioned by Dr. Londoño-McConnell in a previous podcast, children can become very anxious about disasters if familiar adults avoid talking about the topic. In contrast, taking a proactive approach – educating your children about potential situations they may face and how they should react – can minimize their fears an d help them confidently face emergency situations.

Getting parents and teachers involved is the best way to ensure Georgia kids are ready. I encourage you to download the toolkit for use within your classroom or family and to lead by example. As scary as disaster situations can be for adults, they can be even more so for children. Teaching your children how to react and how to prepare will result in less anxiety for not only the kids, but for parents and teachers as well.

Quiz Answers:

  • You and your parent are driving home from school in a heavy rain. You see that the road ahead of you is covered in water. What do you do?

Do not drive through the water. It only takes two feet of water to lift a vehicle, and it is very difficult to gauge how deep swiftly moving water is from behind the wheel of your car. Do not walk through the water, either, as it takes only six inches of swiftly moving water to knock a person off his/her feet. Turn around and find another route to your destination.

  • A smoke alarm wakes you in the middle of the night. What do you do?

Shout, “Fire!” to alert the rest of your family. If your door is closed, use the back of your hand to test it for heat. If it is cool, escape through that door. If it is hot, escape through a window. Stay low as you make your way toward the exit to minimize your exposure to smoke. Close doors behind you to slow the spread of the fire. Once you are out of the house, stay outside and call 911.

  • You’re enjoying an afternoon at the park with your friends, when dark clouds develop and you hear thunder. What do you do?

Move indoors as soon as possible. Do not take shelter under a tree or a metal picnic shelter/shed. If you can’t get indoors, move to a low-lying area. Crouch down on the balls of your feet to make yourself as small as possible and to minimize contact with the ground.

1 reply
  1. syifaun
    syifaun says:

    Maybe I will answer like this:
    1. If the water looks shallow, I still would pass that road. If I turn around looking for another route, it will take a long time to be able to get home.

    2. I would wake up immediately and ran out of the house.

    3. I will immediately seek shelter.

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